98,546 ' / by Nathan Jones

One year ago today, my MBA classmates and I launched a hydrogen-filled balloon into the stratosphere from Carbon, Alberta. The balloon carried video and still cameras as well as radio and GPS tracking equipment. It attained an altitude of 98,546 ' before bursting and traveling back to earth by parachute; its time-of-flight was approximately 75 min. We recovered it from an open field about 110 km from the launch site. 

 The "Project Icarus" team (Elaine, Nathan, William, Faina, and Joming) in Carbon, Alberta, prior to launch. 

The "Project Icarus" team (Elaine, Nathan, William, Faina, and Joming) in Carbon, Alberta, prior to launch. 

 Nathan holding onto the balloon minutes before launch. The styrofoam box held together by red Tuck Tape is the first of two payloads (this one containing video and still cameras.)

Nathan holding onto the balloon minutes before launch. The styrofoam box held together by red Tuck Tape is the first of two payloads (this one containing video and still cameras.)

 The moment just before launch.

The moment just before launch.

 Still capture from the GoPro video footage of the launch site from the perspective of the ballon just seconds following take-off. Nathan (in orange) still has his hands raised in a victory salute.

Still capture from the GoPro video footage of the launch site from the perspective of the ballon just seconds following take-off. Nathan (in orange) still has his hands raised in a victory salute.

 Still capture from the GoPro video footage prior to bursting of the balloon, that is, during the ascent. We thank the Beedie School of Business for sponsoring this project.

Still capture from the GoPro video footage prior to bursting of the balloon, that is, during the ascent. We thank the Beedie School of Business for sponsoring this project.

 Flight path taken by the balloon through the skies of Southern Alberta. Left side is ascent; right is descent. 

Flight path taken by the balloon through the skies of Southern Alberta. Left side is ascent; right is descent. 

 As seen by the balloon on descent.

As seen by the balloon on descent.

 Another view captured by the still camera on descent.

Another view captured by the still camera on descent.